Crafts Magazine Guide to COLLECT 2015 - page 47

that have a relationshipwith the human
form, ultimately to be the support for the
work: to beworn,’ explains Campbell.
Although the show is organised
chronologically, pieceshavebeenselected
todemonstrate themes that arecrucial to
contemporary jewellerysuchas the
interest that arose in the Seventies in
using the non-precious to convey the
value and preciousness of ideas.
Itwas an exploration achieved through
such unlikelymaterials as paper, plastic,
wood, aluminiumand found objects. This
developed into a delight in the narrative:
the telling of stories both personal and
universal; content not skills came to the
fore, with amove fromthe skilled artisan
to the conceptual designer.
Material was, however, significant
in expressing an idea, rather than being a
valuable object in itself. MahRana used
materials such as glass, buttons and paint
to investigate the relationship between
people and jewellery. Karl Fritsch even
crushedprecious stones and reconstituted
themto reject their preciousness.
Materials andprocess grew in importance.
Newsubstances and technologies such as
3D-printing became points of departure
for a different kind of jewellery, with
designers suchasDavidWatkins exploring
newskills, process and practice.
With this came an exploration of
scale and form. Jewellery became an
COLLECT 2015
45
BROADHEADPHOTO:©CRAFTSCOUNCIL / IANDOBBIE | PETERSONPHOTO:© CRAFTSCOUNCIL/JOHNHAMMOND
Above:
22 In 1
Armpiece
, Caroline
Broadhead, cotton,
nylon, 1984
Right:
Allerseelen
,
Hans Stofer,
metal, glass,
olive stones, 1994
Far right:
Dana
, Lina
Peterson, copper
sheet, copperwire,
Swarovski crystals,
plastic, silverwire,
2008-9 (All showing in
I AMHERE)
1...,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46 48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,...84
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