Jump to navigation

Crafts Council

Home // Directory // Kim Bagley // Extermination Tents

Extermination Tents

About this project

In Durban, South Africa, where I grew up, there is an ongoing urban, domestic battle between homeowners and wood boring insects. The insects damage wooden furniture and roof trusses. To get rid of these insects, pest control companies cover suburban houses in large tarpaulin tents and set poison off inside. The tarpaulins contain the poison, keeping it inside the infected house.
These ‘protective’ tarpaulins, which look rather skin-like, were the starting point for this ongoing series of work.

Pricing

£500 — £2000

Keywords

durban, Installation, fumigation, South Africa, skin, clay as skin, paperclay, porcelain, stoneware, extrusion

Disciplines

Ceramics, Pottery, Conceptual

Materials

Ceramics
Two Extermination Tents
Photographer: David Summerill
Studio photographs of a pair of tents that sit on the ground. Paper-porcelain clay over a stoneware structure made from extruded and hand-cut strips of clay.
An Extermination Tent
Photographer: David Summerill
Studio photograph of an individual, free-standing tent. Paper-porcelain with oxides (staining the clay, screen-printed and painted onto the surface), tiny bits of clear glaze. The tent is supported by an inner stoneware structure made from hand-cut and extruded strips of clay.
Detail of an Extermination Tent
Photographer: David Summerill
This image shows a portion of one tent, showing a bluish panel that contain flax fibre. Note how you can see the inner structure affecting the shape of the tent's top line.
Detail of an Extermination Tent
Photographer: David Summerill
Studio photograph of the surface of an individual, free-standing tent. Paper-porcelain with oxides (staining the clay, screen-printed and painted onto the surface), tiny bits of clear glaze. The tent is supported by an inner stoneware structure made from hand-cut and extruded strips of clay.
An Extermination Tent
Photographer: David Summerill
Studio photograph of an individual, free-standing tent. Paper-porcelain with oxides (staining the clay, screen-printed and painted onto the surface), black slip, tiny bits of clear glaze. The tent is supported by an inner stoneware structure made from hand-cut and extruded strips of clay.

Previous project

Scaffold

Disciplines Ceramics, Pottery, Conceptual
Materials Ceramics

Next project

Cattle

Disciplines Ceramics, Pottery
Materials Ceramics
Home
Close