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  1. Studying Craft 16

    The future of craft education is at risk

    What do we know about trends in craft education and training?

    This summary shows how GCSE take-up and Higher Education courses have fallen sharply since 2007/08, while more diverse entry routes into craft suggest rays of hope.

    Help us share the findings from the Crafts Council's Studying Craft 16 report and tackle the risks to formal craft education and training.

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  2. Students taking craft GCSEs are declining faster than GCSEs as a whole

    Change between 2007/08 and 2014/15
    1. 6% All GCSEs
    2. 23% Craft GCSEs
  3. Art, design and technology GCSEs all show a steady decline

    Numbers of students by GCSE in 2007/08
    1. Art & Design

      179,290
    2. Resistant Materials Technology

      79,010
    3. Graphic Products

      61,280
    4. Textiles technology

      41,330
  4. Design & Technology GCSE students are down compared with Art & Design

    Change in numbers of students between 2007/08 and 2014/15
    1. 5% Art & Design GCSEs
    2. 41% Design & Technology GCSEs
  5. The number of sixth formers studying craft has declined

  6. Students taking beginner craft courses are on the increase*

    1 icon = 100 students

      But in comparison, there are only 8% of students studying advanced courses*

    • Since 2012/13, craft courses with more than 50 contact teaching hours are in decline

    • Growth is mainly among older learners

      Numbers of students by age in 2008/09
      1. 19-24yrs

        2290
      2. 25-29yrs

        1810
      3. 30-39yrs

        3140
      4. 40yrs and older

        7870
    • The number of craft courses is down by 50%

    • Take-up for undergraduate craft courses is also down

      Change between 2011/12 and 2014/15
      1. 11% First degree
      2. 60% HNCs, HNDs, Foundation degrees and Foundation courses
      1. Numbers of UK-domiciled students have fallen

        Change between 2008/09 and 2014/15
        1. 15% Undergraduate UK
        2. 66% Undergraduate Non-UK
        3. 27% Postgraduate UK
        4. 70% Postgraduate Non-UK
      2. Non-UK students have risen The abolition of post-study work visas for non-EU students in 2012 risks talent leaving the UK

        Change between 2008/09 and 2014/15
        1. 15% Undergraduate UK
        2. 66% Undergraduate Non-UK
        3. 27% Postgraduate UK
        4. 70% Postgraduate Non-UK
    • Growth in apprenticeships across England offer new routes into crafts

      Change in number of students in craft apprenticeships by region in 2014/15 since 2011/12
      • North East
      • Yorkshire and the Humber
      • North West
      • East Midlands
      • West Midlands
      • East of England
      • London
      • South East
      • South West
    • Of all further and higher education craft students…

      Further and higher education craft students in 2014/15
      85,950
      1 icon = 100 students
      • In summary

        1. Schools: Students studying craft GCSEs are down, especially Design & Technology, and numbers of sixth formers studying craft are falling
        2. Further Education: Fewer skilled professionals are coming out of FE and growth is mainly among older learners
        3. Higher Education: Craft students and courses are rapidly declining, and with more non-UK students, there’s a greater risk of this talent leaving the UK
        4. Diversity: Growth in apprenticeships and diversity is a welcome, albeit small, spark of hope
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      • Our Future is in the Making

        Our education manifesto for craft and making, makes five calls for change:

        1. Put craft and making at the heart of education
        2. Build more routes into craft
        3. Bring craft enterprise into education
        4. Invest in skills throughout careers
        5. Promote world-class higher education and research in craft
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      • The Crafts Council is investing in the future through:

        Make Your Future, a three-year nationwide programme to ignite a passion for craft among 6,000 young people in schools in a partnership with makers.

        Inspiring the Future, a partnership that connects schools with volunteers who speak about their jobs.

      Studying Craft 16

      The future of craft education is at risk

      What do we know about trends in craft education and training?

      Download the Crafts Council's Studying Craft 16 report to see how formal craft education and training is at risk.

      To learn more go to: http://www.craftscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/studyingcraft

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